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Worldwide Cybersecurity Best Practices Part 2

Cybersecurity needs to constantly expand its resources because technology increasing with new devices released every year. Countries around the world have acknowledged this need and have played their part in making the cyber world a safer place.

In part 2 of our series on Worldwide Cybersecurity Best Practices, learn about more cybersecurity initiatives across the globe. 

Canada   

The Canadian Government is investing $80 million over four years (2021-2022 to 2023-2024) to create the Cyber Security Innovation Network, a national network composed of multiple centers of cybersecurity expertise. This includes post-secondary institutions (colleges, universities, research centers, polytechnics), partners in the private sector, not-for-profits, and governments (provincial, territorial, municipal) to enhance research and development and grow cyber security talent across Canada.   

Ntirety Director of Governance Risk and Compliance Wing Lau works in the Vancouver office and will firsthand experience this expansion of cybersecurity resources.    

“With the digital economy continuing to grow rapidly, accelerated by the Covid-19 pandemic, cyber security is an ever-increasing concern for Canadians and businesses,” Lau said.   

Ghana   

Ghana’s Cybersecurity Act , enacted in December 2020, regulates cybersecurity activities, promotes the development of cybersecurity, and provides for related matters. Under this act, the National Computer Emergency Response Team was established and functions to:   

  • Be responsible for responding to cybersecurity incidents
  • Co-ordinate responses to cybersecurity incidents amongst public institutions, private institutions, and international bodies
  • Oversee the Sectoral Computer Emergency Response Team established under section 44

Under Section 60 of the act, the document states that education and awareness programs on cybersecurity will be carried out. As stated under section 61, research and development programs will be designed. This includes actions such as collaborating with academic research centers and developing a framework for cybersecurity training programs.   

Japan   

Japan released their Cybersecurity Strategy in September 2021 that included a plan that would stretch over the next three years to ensure a “free, fair and secure cyberspace.” In order to do this, the government plans on:   

  • Advancing digital transformation (DX) and cybersecurity simultaneously  
  • Ensuring the overall safety and security of cyberspace as it becomes increasingly public, interconnected, and interrelated
  • Enhancing initiatives from the perspective of Japan’s national security

The Cybersecurity Strategy acknowledged, for the first time, China, Russia, and North Korea as cyberattack threats.   

Spain 

In April 2021, the Spanish government committed to investing over €450 million over the course of three years to increase the country’s cybersecurity sector. Carme Artigas, Spain’s state secretary for digitalization and artificial intelligence announced that an online “Hacker Academy” would be available for the country’s residents ages 14 and older as a part of the cybersecurity expansion initiatives.   

This training attracted hundreds of participants. The National Cybersecurity Institute (INCIBE) oversees this strategic plan for spending relating to cybersecurity. Key components of increasing the business ecosystem of the sector and attracting talent include:  

  • Strengthening the cybersecurity of individuals   
  • Strengthening the cybersecurity of Small to Medium Enterprises (SMEs) and professionals   
  • Consolidating Spain as an international cybersecurity hub  

United States   

While the states within the U.S. have passed laws governing cybersecurity, federally nothing has been constructed as far as cybersecurity enforcement specifically. There are, however, national laws in place that protect individuals’ information considered “private.”   

An example of this would be the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) that guards “individually identifiable health information” including data that relates to:   

  • The individual’s past, present, or future physical or mental health or condition 
  • The provision of health care to the individual 
  • The past, present, or future payment for the provision of health care to the individual, and that identifies the individual or for which there is a reasonable basis to believe can be used to identify the individual   

Individually identifiable health information includes identifiers such as name, address, birth date, and Social Security Number.   

The cyber-world can be accessed from almost anywhere on earth; this means that as individuals we must all use caution and do everything that we can to make a safe cyberspace for all. A seemingly harmless action such as clicking on a link can lead to your personal data being stolen and potentially the private data of others.    

The personal data of others is on the line when using a social media account, email, or other places where personal data such as name and birth date is shared online. Being a member of the cyber world means holding yourself and others accountable. Hackers will always be around as long as there is cyberspace, but as global cybersecurity efforts continue to increase, we can be more prepared and respond with greater speed and efficiency.